40 Best Halloween Slime Recipes Your Kids Will Love

Do your kids love slime as much as mine do? While scouring the internet, I was shocked at all the available options for how to make Halloween slime — and just how easy most of them were. Many a Halloween slime recipe can made with common household ingredients.

From sticky to foamy to edible, there is a Halloween slime recipe for every occasion. Read on to learn how to make Halloween slime from some of the biggest slime experts on the web!

Halloween Slime Recipes

Bubbling Eye of Toad Witches Brew

Bubbling Eye of Toad Witches Brew

Any activity with STEM in the title immediately caught my attention.  Merging science and fun is always a win for this mama.  I’ll spare you the chemistry refresher, but When the baking soda combines with the vinegar, it creates a reaction that causes carbon dioxide bubbles to rise to the surface.  One thing to note, however, is that the initial mixture needs to be placed in the refrigerator overnight, or at least for a few hours.  

From: STEAMsational

Witches Brew Erupting Slime

Witches Brew Erupting Slime

Eruption is a buzzword that definitely caught the eye of my 12-year-old-son.  I suggest using a taller and wider container for mixing the slime as it makes for a more explosive eruption, considering the slime rises up and out.  This particular site offers a thorough yet age-appropriate explanation of the science behind slime and the chemistry involved.  You must seize those teachable moments as they arise!  

From: Little Bins for Little Hands

Spider Silk Slime

Spider Silk Slime

Consider yourself warned:  this project leaves quite the mess.  Do it outside and in old clothes.  Halloween decorations in the house are cute.  Trails of dried glue are not.  Luckily the glue washes out easily if there are any mishaps.  With some Elmer’s and liquid starch, you’re well on your way to a sticky, messy goo that serves as the perfect habitat for your spider.  

From: STEAMsational

Spider Web Slime

My 8-year-old daughter screamed when she saw the finished product at first glance, so I knew this was a scary success.  I used a pack of plastic black spiders in assorted sizes from Dollar Tree to place strategically on the web. 

One thing I found interesting about this particular recipe was the use of Instant Snow– a powder that we have used in previous winter activities to create fake snow.  Once the Instant Snow starts to expand after kneading, the slime becomes considerably less stiff.  

From: The Chaos and The Clutter

Glow in the Dark Slime

Glow in the Dark Slime

Find the perfect slime consistency by tinkering with the amount of Borax added to the glue.  The addition of glow in the dark paint and neon food coloring gives the slime its glowing properties.  My kids loved turning out the lights and playing with the assorted colors. 

When mentioning this recipe to a fellow mom friend of mine, she was especially pleased to know that the site included a method that did not involve Borax.  Instead, there was baking soda, contact lens solution, and glow in the dark powder– as opposed to paint.  She assured me that her version turned out equally successful.  

From: A Pumpkin and A Princess

Glowing Alien Rock Slime

Glowing Alien Rock Slime

Anyone who knows me can attest to the fact that the Dollar Tree is my secret weapon for pretty much everything.  Upon seeing a bag of small black pebbles while perusing the craft aisle, inspiration struck. 

My son is obsessed with aliens, so I wanted to give him some slime that would make little green men proud.  I used a basic recipe for slime but subbed regular Elmer’s for glow in the dark glitter glue.  With the addition of some rocks from outer space, our slime was out of this world.  

From: The Tiptoe Fairy

Glitter Glow in the Dark Slime

Glitter Glow in the Dark Slime

The creator of this recipe is a mom who homeschools her seven children. I trust her level of expertise without question.  No doubt she has perfected this glittery, glow in the dark concoction.  One thing that stood out to me in her ingredient list is the use of vetiver essential oil.  My knowledge of essential oils is slim to none, so I wasn’t sure if that was a brand name or scent.  A quick Google search revealed that it is a particular floral scent.  

From: The Chaos and The Clutter

Bloody Zombie Slime

Red food coloring makes the ‘blood’ for this slime, so that’s essential.  I also recommend getting the gallon-sized glue because you’ll want a large pool of blood for maximum impact.  You can’t find this size in most stores, so you’ll probably have to head to Michael’s or Hobby Lobby. 

There’s also a super special ingredient that gives this bloody slime a fluffy consistency:  extra-moisturizing shaving cream.  Experiment with the shaving cream until you find your desired fluff level.  For an extra spooky effect, buy mini-plastic skeletons [maybe even break off a few limbs!] and have them floating around in the giant bowl of slime.  

From: Mom Dot

Creepy Gooey Zombie Slime

By now we all know that glue is a staple for any slime recipe.  Some call for half a dozen other ingredients, which can get complicated.  This one only requires the addition of liquid laundry starch.  If you wish to achieve a stringier consistency of slime, add an extra tablespoon of starch; however, this is optional.  Mixing green, yellow, and brown food coloring created a swampy green color that was perfect for the zombie theme.  

From: STEAMsational

Zombie Slime

zombie slime

Despite the promise of an ‘easy’ recipe, a glance at the instructions made me question the simplicity.  I noticed lots of mixing and adding, along with multiple bowls, one of which was to be set aside for later use. 

Of course, every recipe allows for some wiggle room when it comes to the desired texture, but this slime was said to be quite sticky.  Apparently baking soda and water minimize that effect.  While the addition of fake zombies makes for a fun twist, I believe they could be placed in other, simpler, slime recipes.  

From: DIY Candy

DIY Frankenslime

DIY Frankenslime

I feel like this would be the Martha Stewart version of Halloween slime, if that were her niche.  The process is quite intricate.  Yet the end result is unique, creative, and glows in the dark.  If I were to make these, I’d invite the Mom Group over for some wine and a collaborative team effort.  Because the Frankenslime remains tightly sealed in a mason jar, these make excellent Halloween hostess gifts in addition to festive decorations.  

From: Parenting Chaos

Pumpkin Slime

Pumpkin Slime

Any writer whose blog is called “Mom.  Wife.  Busy Life.” speaks my language fluently.  I appreciated the easy, no-nonsense approach that allowed for a quirky twist with the finished slime.  Mixing red and yellow food coloring allowed for a deep orange color that perfectly resembled a pumpkin.  Adding black glitter and mini black foam balls elevated this slime from basic to brilliant.

All things gross captivate my son. So, naturally, he gravitated towards this recipe that involved ‘guts.’  He helped me scoop out the insides of a large pumpkin, which we then placed in a giant bowl.  After adding the glue and liquid starch, I let him use his hands to mix it all together.  The pumpkin seeds made for some interesting looking chunks which he found delightfully disgusting.  My daughter said it looked like “nasty pumpkin barf.”

 I’d say this was a resounding success considering the overall mission.  Remember though, this a food product, so it needs to be stored in the fridge.

From: Mom Wife Busy Life

Jack-o-Lantern Slime

Jack-o-Lantern Slime

Another hassle-free recipe.  Make slime.  Use orange food coloring to get that pumpkin hue.  A black craft foam sheet provides features for the Jack-O-Lantern.  Chances are you’ll probably have to visit a craft store to get this.  Cut eyes, jagged grins, etc. to decorate your pumpkin.  Pro tip:  In an absolute pinch, black construction paper could probably work, though the overall effect may not be as impressive. 

From: Left Brain Craft Brain

Pumpkin Spice Slime

Pumpkin Spice Slime

Starbucks pumpkin spice lattes fuel my fall season.  I’m a sucker for pumpkin spice flavored anything.  Needless to say, the prospect of pumpkin spice slime instantly intrigued me and I had to try it myself. 

After whipping up a batch of orange slime, I unleashed the secret olfactory ingredient:  McCormick Pumpkin Pie spice.  I used a generous tablespoon and rolled it around to evenly distribute the scent.  It smelled so delicious I could not stop inhaling it.  I wonder what other scented slimes I can explore….

From: A Pumpkin and A Princess

DIY Slime Toolkit

DIY Slime Toolkit

I’ll admit, this is a fusion of multiple recipes.  Select the slime of your choosing.  The simpler, the better.  Make several different batches in several different colors.  Then, take out every imaginable craft supply– glitter, pipe cleaners, construction paper, plastic spiders, googly eyes, felt– you get the idea.  Leave the kids to their own devices and see what they create.  

From: Fun with Mama

Squishy Eyeball Slime

Squishy Eyeball Slime

Red glitter glue and squishy eyeballs make this the slime that never stops staring.  If you can’t find red glitter glue, mix red glitter with regular glue.  However, you can use any color if red isn’t your preference.  As for the squishy eyeballs, you’ll probably have to go to Party City or a Halloween specialty store, as these are not commonly available. 

This is such a fun slime to put in a giant bowl and let little ones dip their fingers in and feel the goop and let the eyeballs roll around in their hands.  Bonus points for The Tiptoe Fairy, who offered an excellent recommendation for non-toxic wipes for easy cleanup after the activity.  

From: Parenting Chaos

Eyeball Slime Minis

Eyeball Slime Minis

I must admit, at first glance I thought these little containers looked like jello shots with eyeballs in them.  Perhaps it’s been too long since I’ve been around other adults.  But I digress.  Pick up the condiment containers [so that’s what they are!] and create your favorite slime. 

The example contained eyeballs, but feel free to grab any small, Halloween-themed item you see at Dollar Tree to use.  Pop the lid on and you have perfect party favors or a fun, unexpected item to drop in the bag of Trick-or-Treaters.  

From: Little Bins for Little Hands

Vampire Slime

Vampire Slime

Past a certain point, many of these slimes become similar in nature and rely on individual creativity to keep them fresh.  This slime is all about the teeth.  We went full camp with this one.  I turned on Dracula in the background and let my kids play with the fake, plastic vampire teeth.  Just don’t put the teeth in your mouth after they’ve been dipped in slime!  

From: Mom Luck

Two-ingredient Vampire Slime

Two-ingredient Vampire Slime

You had me at ‘two-ingredient.’  I was actually shocked when I discovered the two ingredients were water and…Metamucil.  Yes, as in the fiber supplement.  This definitely gets the award for the healthiest slime!  While this is considered taste safe, that is not to be confused with edible.  Little licks and putting it in your mouth are okay.  Eating the entire batch is not.  

From: Little Bins for Little Hands

 Blood and Guts Slime

Just as the description says, this Halloween slime recipe is gooey and gruesome.  Prior to making the blood and guts, it is first necessary to make a batch of avalanche slime [see recipe].  Essentially this involves combining ingredients into a container, turning it upside down, and storing it for a few days until the ingredients mix together. 

Once you’ve reached this step of the process, dump the ingredients on a flat surface.  I suggest using a craft cover because they are inexpensive, reusable, and easy to clean.  Mix and twist the colors together to create your guts.  Throw in some fake bones to really take it to the next level.  

From: Mom Luck

Boiling Blood Slime

Boiling Blood Slime

Make your blood boil with this bubbly recipe.  Xanthan gum and Alka Setlzer tablets combine to form a fizzy reaction.  Add as many Alka Seltzer tablets as you like until the bloody slime boils over the sides of the container. 

The STEAMsational blog, from where this recipe was obtained, offers a detailed explanation as to the science behind the reaction and why heat is not necessary for the potion to bubble.  

From: STEAMsational

Harry Potter Slime

Harry Potter Slime

Whether you’re Team Gryffndor or Team Slytherin, all Harry Potter fans will appreciate the chance to whip out their wands and practice their potion-making skills.  Make two separate batches of slime, one with black glitter glue and the other with orange glitter glue.  Then mix them together for a swirled fusion of magical Halloween colors.  Consider serving Harry Potter-themed snacks or even reading aloud from the books.

From: Steam Powered Family

Slime with Orange Glitter and Confetti

Slime with Orange Glitter and Confetti

I found this recipe to be very cute and great for handing out to guests, but it looked labor-intensive and that was a deterrent for me.  For those parents out there who thrive on detail and intricately planned crafts, this is ideal.  The chunky confetti does add a nice touch, however.  

From: The Farm Girl Gabs

Ghost Slime

Ghost Slime

An easy, low-maintenance slime creation that works wonders for the days where you’re just not at the top of your craft game.  Three ingredients.  No boiling.  No food coloring.  Just plain, clear slime.  I suggest using clear snack-sized cups to turn upside down and drape the slime over to make a ghost-like apparition.  

From: Preschool POWOL Packets

Monster Slime

Monster Slime

My daughter saw a glimpse of this example and instantly got excited.  Though the illustration promotes monster slime, she saw the light blue glitter and said it looked like mermaid water.  I suppose we could always have a Halloween ‘mermonster,’ but this definitely gave me some ideas for other ways to use slime for crafts outside the month of October.  

From: The Idea Room

Ectoplasm Slime

Ectoplasm Slime

Know in advance that this is a sticky, icky slime.  It will stick to everything, so consider yourself warned. Unlike other recipes, this calls for clear glue.  My greatest fear was that my son would think it would be hilarious to fling some of this in his sister’s hair, but luckily that did not happen.  

From: Mom Dot

Unicorn Poop Slime

Hands down, this was my daughter’s favorite slime.  She is absolutely obsessed with unicorns, so I knew she was going to love it.  Also used with clear glue, this will be a sticky, runny, slime.  We assembled multiple colors of pastel food coloring and I let her blend them together as they ran through her fingers.  To commemorate the special occasion, she even put on her unicorn headband, complete with a golden horn.  

From: Mom Dot

Snot Slime

I did a double-take while checking the ingredients list.  Diapers?!  Was I expected to put snotty slime in diapers?  Talk about upping the yuck factor!  Turns out you just make the slime in the diaper, allowing the absorbency to create the fluff, and then you move it to bowls where you mix the green and yellow food coloring together.  Is putting the finished product back into the diapers an option?! 

From: Lemon Lime Adventures

Halloween Floam

Halloween Floam

Foam beads designate the floam status of this slime.  Use your imagination with the beads and food coloring.  Black food coloring and foam beads could be a spider.  Orange food coloring and beads could be a pumpkin.  Green food coloring and beads could be Frankenstein.  You get the idea.  This took me down memory lane as I remember the Nickelodeon floam I used to play with as a child.  

From: Little Bins for Little Hands

Volcano Slime

Volcano Slime

Similar to another eruption previously discussed, this one we did not actually try.  Although from our first science lesson, my kids understand the basic concept between acidic and basic chemical reactions, the steps in this recipe seemed more involved.  

I did appreciate the tips about different warm colors of food coloring to create a multicolored, realistic-looking eruption.  I’ll have to file this one in the back of my mind for when it’s time for the infamous junior high volcano experiment.  

From: Little Bins for Little Hands

Fright Night Movie Slime

A new ingredient caught my eye here:  Elmer’s  Magical Liquid.  Apparently this is a special slime activator.  Who knew?  I’ll have to tinker with this in some more recipes.  Mix the Elmer’s glue and activator and– here comes the fun part– add popcorn.  Drizzle this on the table [covered with newspaper] as you have a movie night with the kiddos.  Serve them actual popcorn that does not come from the slime.

* Certain slimes deserve the distinction of being fluffy.  Here are some of the best: *

Zombie Fluff Slime

Zombie Fluff Slime

Shaving cream is the key component to the fluff here.  Combined with baking soda, glue, and saline solution, this slime is full of fluff.  We chose to mix green and black food coloring and I really went above and beyond by purchasing a plastic mold that looked like a brain.  

From: Little Bins for Little Hands

Frankenstein Fluffy Slime

Frankenstein Fluffy Slime

I would suggest putting these in little black bowls to mimic a witch’s cauldron.  The actual recipe gives a strong, kid-friendly science background about the chemical reaction and how the shaving cream factors into the process.  It also includes good tips for changing the consistency of your slime and how to make it more or less stiff.  

From: Natural Beach Living

Pumpkin Fluffy Slime

Pumpkin Fluffy Slime

Instantly I connected to this recipe because it reminded me of the pumpkin spice slime.  One of the ingredients– abeit optional– was pumpkin scented oil.  I’m big on smells if that’s not yet obvious.  

Be sure to use unscented shaving cream if you are going to use the pumpkin oil so the scents don’t clash.  Make the slime with orange food coloring, put it in a mason jar, and use black felt to make a face.  Inhale deeply as you unseal the lid to play with the slime.  

From: I Heart Arts n Crafts.

* Two of my favorite edible recipes are below.  While they can be consumed, keep the doses small. These are not being served for dinner. *

Edible Candy Slime

Edible Candy Slime

This super stretchy slime reminded us of silly putty.  Because it is taste-safe, we actually used candy in the recipe.  My daughter suggested Starburst since our candy bowl for prospective Trick-or-Treaters was overflowing.  

Combine the candy with powdered sugar and corn starch and microwave.  Caution:  this will be hot so make sure the candy slime cools before allowing the kids to touch and eat.  Laffy Taffy would also be another good option for candy if you don’t have Starburst.  

From: The Soccer Mom Blog

Edible Witches Brew Slime

Edible Witches Brew Slime

I’m always looking for an excuse to use gummy worms and this was the perfect opportunity.  With the addition of some other gummy candies [bears, body parts, etc.], I microwaved them for 30 seconds. Once cooled, I added even more gummy candies to the mix.  As you can imagine, this is sugar overload.  Maybe this is an activity you can suggest they try with their grandparents!  

From: Teach Beside Me

What are your favorite slime recipes? Have you discovered any tips and tricks that could benefit other slime makers? Be sure to let me know in the comments below.

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